Spoils of Time Asian Ceramics and Works of Art
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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1700 item #1427590
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$3,900.00
The sword stand does not convey with the sword.
A Mino katana attributed to Sue-Koto Kanenori. This would place the sword anywhere from 15th century to 16th century. As it is o-suriage (shortened from the tang), no signature remains. Good, healthy condition with tight jigane, good edge. Nagasa (cutting edge) 26 13/16 inches. NTHK-NPO kanteisho origami certificate. Needs a cleaning. In gunto (military) mounts as it was carried during World War II. Tsuka recently rewrapped. The sword stand does not convey with the sword.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1700 item #1397653
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Probably Echizen province, late 16th or 17th century. Bizen province artisans also took up Yoshiro zogan inlay work in the Kinai (ancient provinces and surrounds) manner. Brass (valuable in the period) and silver inlay flush with the iron surface was thought to have been introduced by an artisan named Yoshiro, for whom it is named. Slightly earlier, Heianjo school work tends to rest atop the surface into which it is inlaid. Late Muromachi or early Edo period. Length, about 12 inches. More pictures coming
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1837 VR item #1397299
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A Japanese iron war fan, or 'Gunbai'. These were accessories used on the battlefield to fan in heat but also as lethal, close quarter defensive accessories. A rare item not commonly encountered on the market. Black lacquered and with gold lacquer kanji quoting Sun Tzu (fifth century Chinese political and war strategist). "Swift as the wind, quiet as the forest, fierce as fire, immovable as the mountain", from 'The Art of War', popularized by 16th century Japanese warlord and Buddhist layman, Takeda Shingen. This fan is probably not earlier than the Edo period (1603-1868). Condition is fair with some lacquer loss. Length, 19 7/8 inches. More pictures coming
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1800 item #1395349
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A fine, Mishina school tanto, forged and signed collaboratively, Omi no Kami Minamoto Hisamichi and Chakushi Minamoto Rai Hisatsugu with edakiku (branched chrysanthemum) above the two signatures. Dated on the verso 'a day in August of Genroku 15' (1702). In full polish, in shirasaya, accompanied with original koshirae with fine fittings including floral and snow on persimmons motifs. Included are kozuka, kogai, tsuba, fuchi-gashira, menuki. Accompanying documents include NBTHK Hozon certificate and old Japanese domestic registration card. Cutting edge 10 inches. Length including tang about 14 1/4 inches. Length of koshirae about 18 inches. More pictures coming later
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1837 VR item #1343243
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$540.00
A large Tembo tsuba. The Tembo (or Tenpo) style evolved from the Saotome school and the sukashi decoration of Okiagari here (an especially nice feature) carries over. Okiagari are self righting toys and the subject was a symbol of inspiration to Samurai in aspiring to improvement and the right path in life. There is, on a curious level of interest, some minute trace of old gold decoration (long since worn off) on the surface of this tsuba. Though there are transitional examples, the present example has a drier feel more typical of Tembo iron (Saotome examples having a smoother, wetter feel.) The kozuka-ana plugged with, apparently, pewter. Edo period. Good condition with one small scratch (should be easily treatable.) Height 3 3/8 inches (85 cm), Width 3 3/16 inches (81.5 cm), and 5/32 of an inch (4 cm) thick.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1800 item #1343239
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A simple, small but stout iron tsuba. The Myochin line of metal workers were armor makers who also produced tsuba. The simple decoration upper-right here could be a flower head or a snowflake. Udenuki-ana appear lower left. Good condition. Height 2 3/4 inches (69 cm), Width 2 9/16 inches (65 cm), and 6/32 of an inche (5 mm) thick.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1837 VR item #1342841
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$675.00
An Edo period iron tsuba with stylized wave motif. Carved and chiseled details on the waves enhancing the inference to water. The symmetric depiction likely a ka-mon (heraldic device). A nearly identical tsuba can be found in the Boston Museum of Fine Art, accession number 11.11500, with the minor exceptions of a more rounded seppa-dai in the present tsuba with gilt, kinko band probably intended to fit the tsuba with a particular koshirae. This tsuba must be the same school if not the same workshop as the BMA tsuba. Nami (wave) Mon was used by several families. A symmetrical variant not very unlike that used in this tsuba (repeated four times to form a mokko shape) was used by the Maeno (surname of an Oda Nobunaga retainer), the Soga, the Shimazaki and a few variants by the Oguri. 17th-18th century. Very good condition. About 2 3/4 inches (6.99 cm) high, 2 9/16 inches (6.51 cm) wide, 3/16 inches (.48 cm) thick.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1700 item #1342321
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A 16th century Yoshiro Zogan tsuba. The type is named for a Kaga province artist considered to have advanced the late Onin period brass inlay art to that of hira-zogan - flush with the iron surface. The school also took hold in other provinces, most notably Bizen. The mokko-gata form of this tsuba would appear to be uncommon for Yoshiro Zogan tsuba particularly of katana size. Eight ka-mon are inlaid in open work fashion. The remaining surface decorated with a network of brass inlay depicting algae. Hitsu-ana for kozuka and kogai also lined with brass. From the Onin period when brass inlay became popular, the metal was highly valued. This tsuba is late Muromachi period to possibly Momoyama period. It is in very good condition with apparently uneven rubbing to some of the inlaid brass while the patina on iron surfaces is undisturbed. The very light, old loss of brass inlay is good as this type of brass inlay often sees more loss as the underlying iron surrenders surface with oxidation. About 3 1/4 inches (9.53 cm) high, about 3 1/8 inches (7.94 cm) wide, about 5/32 inches (4 mm) thick.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1900 item #1340187
Spoils of Time
$625.00
A well forged, handsome mokume tsuba in mokko-gata form with katakiri-bori landscape decoration on both the omote and ura. The mokume grain is large and well controlled reminding one of ayasugi hada. In fact, this tsuba is indeed a tosho (swordsmith's) tsuba, being made by [Kai Ju] Kiyonaga and dated the third year of Bunkyo (1863) believed to be the same as KIY 298 referenced in Hawley's, Japanese Swordsmiths. Our angled, side view photographs more accurately portray patina and color as well as the mokume grain. Good condition. 3 5/8 inches (8.4 cm) X 3 3/8 inches (8.1 cm) and 7/32 inches thick (.55 cm) at the raised mimi and about 1/8 inch (.32 cm) thick at the seppa-dai. The raised mimi and no taper across the plate are atypical of traditional tosho tsuba. But the present example being 19th century, and toward the end of the Edo period, allows latitude for creativity. Ex Arnold Frenzel collection. If both sensitivity and strength are conveyed in the smith's blades as they are in this tsuba, I would be tempted to acquire one of his swords.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1837 VR item #1339907
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An armorer's (katshushi) tsuba by Miochin Munekane (signed.) Of smaller size associated with wakizashi. Engraved katakiri-bori flowers and vine decoration (six petals on vine, possibly clematis.) Artist line active between 1818 and 1887. Ex Robert Haynes collection. Good condition. A larger, sukashi tsuba at least by the same line, also signed Miochin Munekane, is in the Brooklyn Museum. 2 9/16 inches (6.5 cm) X 2 3/8 inches (6.1 cm) and 1/8 inch (.4 cm) thick.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1800 item #1338183
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A strong mokogata iron tsuba of tight mokume. I favor mokume work and this is a virtuous example worthy of any collection. Boar's eye sukashi decoration in the four corners. Uchikaeshi mimi. Tekkotsu evident along the mimi. Good condition with light rubbing of the patina. Edo period. 3 (7.6 cm) inches x 2 11/16 (6.8 cm) inches
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1700 item #1338182
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$435.00
A simple, four lobed armorer's tsuba with simple pierced decoration perhaps depicting a landscape with structure. The udenuki-ana (cord holes) have the effect of completing the illusion of a Sesshu-like landscape. The saotome were armorers turned tsuba makers who worked in this manner and scale. Good condition with good tekkotsu. Sengoku era. 2 15/16 (7.46 cm) inches x 2 5/8 (6.67 cm) inches
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1700 item #1338169
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$675.00
A katchushi mutsu-gata sukashi tsuba. The six lobed, thin plated armorer's tsuba with good tekkotsu and with openwork decoration was described by Skip Holbrook (ex collection) as Saotome made and depicting three birds. The Saotome were a line of armorers (katchu) turned tsuba makers. But I think a case could be made for the sukashi decoration being a wabi-sabi flower bloom or possibly paulownia leaves (rather than awkward looking "birds".) Use of the paulownia (kiri) mon could suggest Yamakichibei as those tsuba makers, from Owari, were outfitting swords for the Oda and the Toyotomi - the latter using the kiri ka-mon. Good condition. 2 7/8 (7.3 cm) inches x 2 13/16 (7.14 cm) inches
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1700 item #1333910
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$975.00
An iron, Ko-Tosho (early sword smith's) tsuba. The slightest taper from seppa dai towards rim. Pierced decoration. Purchased from Andy Quirt (ex Skip Holbrook collection) at the February 2016 Tampa show, he thought it depicted gourds. I guess the beholder might see different things. I see Japanese eggplants on leafy vine (two fruit and two leaves) supported by a bamboo trellis. An uncommon and well executed, balanced decoration. The hitsu-ana appears to be original to the tsuba. Late Muromachi. Good condition - has seen some pitting in the past but now stable (chalk it up to tekkotsu, history and character - tekkotsu attractively conspicuous on the rim), well worn to the touch, and with a good, dark patina. 2 7/8" (7.3 cm) marugata. 1/8" (3.17 mm) thick at the mimi. 3/16" (4.47 mm) thick at the seppa-dai.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1700 item #1333826
Spoils of Time
$695.00
An armorer's iron tsuba, possibly for a wakizashi as it is somewhat diminuitive in size. Or perhaps more in keeping with its apparent age, an early example of a proportionately small tsuba used with an uchigatana as was first the fashion. Sukashi decoration of a conch (horagai) traditionally used for ritual practices and for signaling on the battlefield. The rare uchikaeshi-hineri rim (mimi) is significantly raised and defined almost as if to suggest a separate piece of iron around the rim (though it is one with the plate.) Though the small sukashi might suggest tosho (swordsmith), the distinct and high rim clearly indicates ko-katchushi (old armorers) work. Good condition with tekkotsu, dark patina and some inert, brown surface rust for which we are lightly applying oil when dry (we prefer not to overclean or dry out a tsuba so will not take some of the more invasive measures against only light rust.) This tsuba has an early feel - perhaps early Muromachi. 2 3/4" (7 cm) marugata. The thickness of the plate is about 1/8" (.32 cm). The thickness at the rim is about 1/4" (.63 cm)
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1700 item #1333823
Spoils of Time
$575.00
A katchushi (or armorer's) tsuba, probably Myochin, with pierced decoration of ship's rudders (the significance being a comparison of rudders steering a ship to values guiding a Samurai's life choices.) The strong, homogenous, dense iron plate with only light tekkotsu and smooth to the touch. Dark patina. Momoyama to early Edo. Good condition: Lamination folds with openings evident on the surface of one side. Ex Skip Holbrook collection. 3 3/32" x 3 1/16" x 1/8" (7.8 cm x 7.7 cm x .32 cm)
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1700 item #1333535
Spoils of Time
$650.00
An armorer's tsuba, with very slightly raised rim on the strong, flat iron plate. Pierced decoration of a shrimp with pleasing, subtle swell along the antennae and legs (mostly on the ura.) Small, irregular brass inlays for the eyes (missing from one eye - not conspicuous.) The kogai-ana plugged with a copper rich alloy. Oval form about 2 7/8" (7.3 cm) by 2 3/4" (6.985 cm). Thickness at rim about 5/32" (.39 cm). Late 16th century to early 17th century - perhaps Momoyama period. Or possibly earlier with hitsu-ana added (though old). Good condition with varieagated hues in the dark, lustrous patina likely with extant lacquer adhering and accounting for some of the black color (note that the tsuba has an overall dark, mottled patina which our lighting doesn't adequately portray). Subtle tekkotsu evident - some old, worn pitting with the surface now smooth, almost soapy to the touch.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1900 item #1319508
Spoils of Time
$245.00
A pair of Niō or Kongōrikishi figural menuki. The copper-bronze alloy with traces of black patina suggesting possibly rubbed shakudo (meaning the alloy may have a low gold content which composition would take a blue-black patination.) Gold details decoration of attire. While a pair of Kongōrikishi would typically form Ah-um ("Ah", mouth opened and "Um", mouth closed), this is not easily discerned with the present pair which also strike the same (rather than opposed) posture. It may be that this wasn't deemed important when each would be wrapped on a different side of a tsuka. Or these may be a very well matched menuki from different pairs (there are slight differences.) In any event, they would work very well together on a tsuka. Good condition. Solder evidence on back as they were affixed to a cha-donsu. Each length, 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm)